Category: Mentions

The Internet of Things foreshadows Commerce of Things

Originally featured in Internet Retailer

Last year, I backed a Kickstarter project called runScribe, a little Internet-connected device you clip to your running shoes. The runScribe is at the vanguard of the “Internet of Things,” the rapidly expanding universe of connected objects that are transforming the ways we relate to our physical environment. It tracks extremely fine-grained information about how I run, stores and analyzes the data in the cloud, and visualizes that information to help me run faster and with fewer injuries.

But what if intelligence and connectivity weren’t confined to a little doodad attached to my tennis shoes, but actually built into every pair? What if my shoes could actually replace themselves when they wore out, sending me a new pair in the mail at just the right time? What if, rather than just reporting on my world, my running shoes could actually take action—with my permission and on my behalf—to make my life better? Continue reading

Written by Comments Off on The Internet of Things foreshadows Commerce of Things Posted in Mentions

The Future of Mobile Commerce

Originally appeared on Digital River’s Blog

I’m writing this post on a laptop, but there’s a good chance you’re not reading it on one. The shift to mobile has profound consequences for merchants. Recent research estimates that almost half of online retail sales in the seven largest EU markets will happen on mobile devices by 2018. In the next three years, phone and tablet commerce in the UK alone is expected to grow just over 50 percent. For retailers, then, the question isn’t whether to design “mobile-first,” it’s how. Continue reading

The Recurring Revenue Revolution

Originally featured in Digital Marketing Magazine

Usage-based billing is revolutionising the ecommerce industry as consumers demand ever more flexibility in the way that they buy, and pay for, goods and services. With technology increasingly making it possible for consumers to pay only for what they use, we are set to see significant changes across sectors in 2015 and beyond. Digital services businesses should be looking to integrate at least one method of usage-based billing in their business model in order to tap into new revenue streams and maintain customer satisfaction in an increasingly competitive environment.

As we move away from the traditional model of single purchase and use, and enter the usage-based billing age, what monetisation models should companies be looking to implement? There are two main models businesses should consider – subscription and freemium. Continue reading

Innovation Shaping the Store of the Future

Originally featured in Supply & Demand Chain Executive

If you’re developing an e-commerce strategy to position your business for success in the future, you can’t do it without giving some thought to what the store of the future will look like. We can assume it will be innovative, but in what way?

When people think of innovation, some imagine a widget that changes everything. But innovation doesn’t have to be a revolutionary new widget. It can be a new way of thinking, a shift that changes cultural expectations of how we buy, consume, or experience a product or service. Continue reading

Innovation Shaping The Store Of The Future

Originally featured in Twice Magazine

When people think of innovation, they may think about a latest product — a widget that changes everything. But innovation doesn’t have to be a revolutionary new widget; it can be a new way of thinking, a shift that changes cultural expectations about how we buy, consume or experience a product or service.

Today’s consumers are looking for innovations that make it easier and faster to enjoy their product purchases. Consider the evolution of music, from vinyl to cassette to CD. Industry advances originally focused on improving sound quality, but more recent innovations have focused on delivery and business models, including instant downloads and streaming services like Pandora, Spotify and Rhapsody. The success of these new music delivery channels illustrates the reality of today’s on-demand generation of customers who expect flexibility in the way they access products and services.

So how will these expectations shape the store of the future? We can assume it will be innovative, but in what way?
Continue reading

Innovation Shaping The Store Of The Future

Originally featured in Digital Marketing Magazine

To succeed in a rapidly changing marketplace, company leaders need clear vision and a detailed plan. If you’re developing a product and ecommerce strategy to drive sales now and position your business for success in the future, you’ve probably given considerable thought to consumer trends, emerging opportunities and the challenges you’ll face as you create and roll out your strategy.

What will the store of the future look like? We can assume it will be innovative, but in what way? When people think of innovation, some imagine the latest product – a widget that changes everything. But innovation doesn’t have to be a revolutionary new widget. It can be a new way of thinking, a shift that changes cultural expectations of how we buy, consume or experience a product or service. Continue reading

The Culture of Instant Gratification and the Online Economy

Originally featured in Internet Retailing

We have become consumers of instant gratification – and we are willing to pay a premium to get it. It’s instant gratification that is driving tourists to pay more for a FastPass at Disney World so they don’t have to wait in line. And it’s why Amazon shoppers are willing to pay an annual membership fee to get faster shipping and instant access to their favourite movie titles.

Instant gratification, however, is not only driving what we buy, it’s also influencing how we buy – and it has become a formidable force in shaping the online economy. Continue reading

Seven Key E-Commerce Trends for 2014

Originally featured in Wired

In 2014, online shoppers will have more choice and more information at their fingertips than ever before. The rise of social networks, the mass adoption of mobile devices and the sheer breadth of global companies is transforming how consumers research products and make purchase decisions.

In turn, these connected consumers are leaving behind a record of their behaviors, preferences and interests, which in turn are providing an ever-growing source of knowledge for companies. Entire e-commerce strategies are emerging around this proliferation of digital activity and resulting data. Nonetheless, these mobile, social and data revolutions will be circumscribed by global shifts in economic and political power, and the challenges of operating globally and locally simultaneously. These market dynamics and others are at the center of seven key trends that we believe will define e-commerce in 2014. Continue reading